In my previous blog, I wrote about what causes Candida overgrowth and how it affects health and weight gain.

Today, I am going to give you an effective strategy to treat candida overgrowth and lose fat around the waist!

Depending on the extent of overgrowth, treatment can take anything from 8 – 12 weeks.

 

PHASE 1: STARVE THE YEAST

During this phase, we will eliminate foods that feed Candida for at least 14 days.

The most common foods to eliminate are:

Sugar, gluten-containing grains (wheat, barley, rye, spelt), dairy, soy, corn, nightshade vegetables (tomatoes, eggplants, potatoes, peppers), squash, beets and turnips, beans, lentils, chickpeas, alcohol, dyes and preservatives.

Some other foods to minimize – vinegar and pickled products, nuts especially cashews, goji berries, red meat, mayonnaise,  coffee, chocolate.

For these 14 days, your diet should consist of moderate amounts of lean proteins (chicken, turkey, fish), high quantities of a variety of greens and minimal fats. If you are insulin-sensitive and/or are involved in intense training, you can use carbohydrates like quinoa and brown rice.

 

PHASE 2 : FIGHT THE YEAST

After 14 days, we can start fighting the overgrowth, while keeping the same nutrition guidelines as above.

I use the following supplements for the first 4 weeks with my clients:

St. Francis Echinaseal

HMF Genestra Candigen (vaginal suppositories for women)

AOR Saccaromyces Boullardi (capsules for men)

 After this, replace the Echinaseal with Renew Life Candigone for another 4 weeks.

 

PHASE 3: RESTORE BALANCE OF GUT BACTERIA

The goal of this ‘maintenance’ phase is to ensure the balance between candida and good bacteria in the gut is maintained. 

Here we incorporate fermented vegetables like sauerkraut and kimchi (half to 1 cup daily). These vegetables provide an environment in your gut for good bacteria to flourish. 

I like using CanPrev Synergy C and CanPrev Magnesium bis-glycinate as well for a strong immune system and regular bowel movements (to avoid undigested food being stored in the gut).